Aviation Career Guide - information on flight school training, studying for an aviation degree, military flying and all the certificates including PPL, CPL, ATPL, CFI, CFII and MEI. (new)
Back to Main Page Home Bookmark this page Bookmark Tell a friend about AviationCareerGuide.com Tell a Friend Contact Us Contact
 Flight School USA Best Aviation Jobs
 Flight School Europe Flight School Europe
 Requirements Requirements
 Start your aviation career Getting Started
 Flight Club Flight Club
 Flight School Flight School
 Aviation Degree Programs Aviation Degree
 Military Flying Military Flying
 Ab Initio/Modular Ab Initio/Modular
 Student Visas Student Visas

 Medical Certificate Medical Certificate
 Private Pilot License (PPL) Private Pilot
 Commercial Pilot License (CPL) Commercial Pilot
 Flight Instructor Certificate (CFI/FI) Flight Instructor
 Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL) Airline Pilot (ATPL)

Main Menu

 IMC Rating IMC Rating
 Instrument Rating Instrument Rating
 Multi Engine Class Multi Engine Class
 Type Rating Type Rating
 Endorsements Endorsements

Main Menu

 Aviation Salaries Aviation Salaries
 Terms & Abbreviations Abbreviations
 Aviation Links Aviation Links
 Add an Aviation Link Add Aviation Link
 Add Flight School Add Flight School
 Link to Us Link to Us

Main Menu

Do you want more students to your aviation school? We receive e-mails every day from people all over the world looking for a school to train with. Find out how we can help!

[Learn More Here!]

Promote a School


 Avitop Avitop.com
 BestAviationSites BestAviationSites
 JetThrust.com JetThrust.com
 Compilots.com ComPilots.com
 AvCanada Toplisting AvCanada Toplisting
Avitop.com

Top Listings

Flight Schools
Helicopter Schools
Flight Attendant
Aviation Colleges
Aircraft Maintenance Schools
Multi Engine Time Building
Type Rating Courses


Private Pilot License – PPL

Private Pilot License – PPL Every year thousands of people around the world take the first step into aviations finest arena; they become private pilots.

The private pilot license (PPL) can be compared to your driving license and is a must for anyone who pursues a career as an aviator. Like your driving license it gives you certain privileges and limitations. You can act as pilot in command on the airplanes you are rated and can bring along passengers. Most people obtaining a PPL use it for leisure and are often connected to a flight club. As airplanes can be expensive to own they are usually owned by the club and rented out to the members.

Private Pilot License in the United States (FAA)
To obtain a PPL in the US all you need is an airplane and a certified instructor. This you can find by contacting your local flight club or a nearby flight school. If you look to obtain a PPL and fly for leisure (fun) it is seldom necessary to look far. Most cities across America with an airport have a flight club or a flight school.

Before getting the PPL you need a certain amount of training. You need a minimum of 40 hours flight time (most students have an average of 60-80 hours much depending on how often they fly) and you have to pass a written exam. Students who go with a flight club usually buy the textbooks and study on their own to pass the written exam. This is a computer based multiple-choice test of 60 questions. If you train with a flight school they may offer ground school classes that cover the theory.

While studying for the written you start flying with an instructor. He will teach you the basics needed to safely maneuver an aircraft. And after 15-20 hours of flight time you make your first solo flight.

The next 20-50 hours are dominated by dual flights with your instructor, cross country flights to learn how to properly navigate, solo training flights and solo cross country flights. When your instructor feels the necessary skill level is reached he signs you up for a “check ride”.

A “check ride” is conducted by a certified examiner and usually done in the airplane you learned how to fly. You start with an oral exam of about an hour. Here you are asked questions to test the knowledge level and you cover a pre-planned cross country flight. After passing the oral part of the “check ride” you fly.

The flying part of the PPL check ride takes from an hour to an hour and a half. Here you cover the basic maneuvers, navigation skills and take offs and landings. Often the ride is started of as a cross country flight where you fly the first check points on the cross country route before doing maneuvers and finish of with landing rounds at the airport.

After passing the check ride the examiner issue you a PPL and you are now an FAA pilot.

Private Pilot License in Europe (JAA)
To obtain a PPL in Europe you either have to join a flight school or become member of a flight club. The availability of training facilities vary depending on where in Europe you live, but if you want to obtain a private pilot license for leisure flying a flight club is usually the cheapest alternative.

Before getting the PPL you need a certain amount of training. You need a minimum of 40 hours flight time (most students have an average of 60-80 hours much depending on how often they fly) and you have to pass a written exam.

The written exam consists of 7 topics put together in a written multiple-choice test. As the theory is pretty time consuming most flight clubs or flight schools recommend you don’t fly very much before passing the exam.

Ones the written exam is out of the way you can concentrate on the flying. For the first 15-20 hours you and your instructor will cover the basics needed to safely maneuver an aircraft. You learn how to take off, climb, turn, decent and land. When your instructor feels comfortable you can do this safely he signs you of for a solo flight.

The next 20-50 hours are dominated by flights with your instructor, cross country flights to learn how to properly navigate, solo training flights and solo cross country flights. When your instructor feels the necessary skill level is reached he signs you up for a “check ride”.

A “check ride” is conducted by a certified examiner and usually done in the airplane you learned how to fly. You start by having a short oral exam. Here you are asked some questions to test the knowledge level and you cover a pre-planned cross country flight. After passing the oral you fly. After passing the oral part of the “check ride” you fly.

The flying part of the PPL check ride takes from an hour to an hour and a half. Here you cover the basic maneuvers, navigation skills and take offs and landings. Often the ride is started of as a cross country flight where you fly the first check points on the cross country route before doing maneuvers and finish of with landing rounds at the airport.

After passing the check ride the examiner issue you a PPL and you are now a JAA pilot.

4/30/2004
Best Aviation Schools
Flight School Database

Advertise Here
Copyright © 2004 Best Aviation. All rights reserved. | Privacy Policy